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It Takes a Creative Mind to Stop a Devious Mind

  
  
  
  

I recently watched a movie that really made me think about how the cryptographic landscape has evolved. Eighty years ago encryption was almost entirely the domain of military organizations. Now it is ingrained in nearly every business transaction that takes place every day. The average person hardly takes notice. Will strong encryption, secure key management, and complex passphrases be enough to stop attacks of future?

Data-Privacy-Ebook A Chink in the Armor

We can scarcely avoid them these days. The “smart phone” seems to have been the catalyst that blew our (at the very least my) cozy concept of privacy right out of the water. Most people trust that their data is secured by whatever cell service they use or by the social media site they frequent. Few people take responsibility for their own sensitive data management. Perhaps they do not feel there is a need, or perhaps they do not consider it sensitive.

I feel that this is not the right attitude. Consider, for instance, the webcam and mic. Fifteen years ago I needed to go to an electronics store to purchase a golf ball sized orb on a clip to use video chat, or spend upwards of $300 if I wanted to film my friends and I skiing. Those devices needed to be plugged in or turned on to work.

Now, just in my house alone, I have at least six HD cameras in the form of old smart-phones, laptops, and gaming devices. Most of those devices are always on by design, and vulnerable to breach. Suppose there was sensitive information within view of one of those cameras, even if it’s just a calendar. It’s worth thinking about, especially considering that today just about every device comes with an integrated camera. Video game systems can listen to our conversations and respond to verbal queues (and in some cases movement). Software can now turn speech into text accurately and reliably. Taking this into account, sensitive data now goes far beyond a credit card or social security number. Everything you say or do in your own home is now, quite possibly, sensitive data.

Rising to Meet Future Threats

Very soon the smartphone will be among the least of our worries. Things like computerized smart glasses, smart watches, and other smart appliances will start to invade our workplaces and homes. This raises a very real security concern when you think about it. All it would take is one compromised smartwatch to capture a password from a whiteboard. In fact it may not even be as sneaky as all that. I recently read a funny article that detailed three or four data security slips. In each of the instances there was a photo of an anchor with sensitive data such as a password in the shot behind them. These were photos deliberately taken without regard for what was captured in the shot. Responsibility for the photos falls on the photographer in that case.

That article did make me think though. Would crafty attackers be inclined to hack the cameras of personal devices? A smartphone that’s in your pocket most of the time might pose little threat, but what about a smart watch? Could a particularly determined attacker gain access to Database Administrators home appliances? What if they were able to learn of a passphrase or record business conversations by hacking an entertainment system? It would be worth the attempt if it meant the keys to the kingdom.

Surely you’ve implemented, or at the very least heard of the following security steps. These are the basics, the steps you take to prevent a conventional attack

  1. Deploy strong encryption wherever possible, and adopt a strong key management solution.
  2. Do not keep passwords written down, especially on whiteboards.
  3. Use strong passwords like phrases that include dashes, or numbers are great.
  4. Develop and enforce policies regarding security best practices on employee’s personal and home devices.

Finally, lets make the safe assumption that attackers are thinking outside of the box. It follows that we too must think creatively to stop data breaches. Now lets pretend that an attacker has hacked a smartwatch or webcam and acquired a password to your database. That attacker has just bypassed most of the security measures you’ve put in place. The only thing that will stop an attack at this stage is a strong two-factor authentication solution. If deployed on the breached system the attacker tries to enter the stolen passphrase. Instead of gaining access the screen displays an Alert. “A text message has been sent to your phone, please enter the 6 digit pin to continue”. Two Factor Authentication saves the day. As more and more digital devices flood the workplace the need for another line of defense become very real.

Turning a Blind Eye to Data Security eBook

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Why Key Management is So Critical in the...

  
  
  
  

... Life Cycle of an Encryption Key!

As more companies choose virtual storage environments and move data to the cloud, protection of encryption keys become an even more important part of a solid data security strategy.

eBook - Encryption Key Management Simplified Let’s take a look at how data protection can be achieved with a solid key management solution and the proper handling of the actual encryption keys. From the creation of a key, through it’s use, and eventually to its deletion, an encryption key management solution allows an administrator to be able to securely and efficiently handle the encryption keys throughout the length of its life cycle. The key management administrator is responsible for performing a number of functions and must also follow industry best practices in order to secure the data they need to protect. There is far more to encryption key management than just storing the encryption key somewhere. Generally, a key storage device only provides storage of the encryption key, and you need to create the key elsewhere. There is a very real need, and very specific guidelines that require you to store and manage your encryption keys away from the encrypted data. With an encryption key manager, there is a whole set of management capabilities and a suite of functions that provide dual control, create separation of duties, implement two factor authentication, generate system logs, and perform audit activities, along with managing the key life cycle.

This encryption key life cycle, which is defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), also requires that a crypto period be defined for each key. A crypto period is the length of time that a key should be used and is determined by a number of factors based on how much data is being protected and how sensitive that data is. NIST has defined and provided some parameters on how to establish crypto periods (see special publications 800-57 - there are 3 parts) and provided guidance on best practices. Using those guidelines, each key management administrator needs to determine how long a particular encryption key should be actively used before it is rotated or retired.

These are a few of the factors that go into establishing the crypto period for a key (which maybe a few days or weeks or longer up to one or two years it really depends on the data that you're trying to protect):

  • How is the data being used
  • How much data is there
  • How sensitive is the data
  • How much damage will be done when the data is exposed or the keys are lost

Now, let’s take a closer look at the phases of a key life cycle and what a key management solution should do during these phases:

The Encryption Key Life Cycle

The Life Cycle of an Encryption Key

Key Creation (Generation & Pre-Activation):

First, the encryption key is created and stored on the key management server (which can be a hardware security module (HSM), virtual environment (VMware) or a true cloud instance). The key can be created by a sole administrator or through dual control by two administrators. The key manager creates the AES key through the use of a cryptographically secure random bit generator and stores the key, along with all it’s attributes, into the key storage database (which should be encrypted). The attributes stored with the key include its name, activation date, size, instance, the ability for the key to be deleted, as well as its rollover, mirroring, and key access attributes. The key can be activated upon its creation or set to be activated automatically or manually at a later time. The key manager should be able to create keys of three different sizes: 128, 192, or 256-bit. The encryption key manager should track current and past instances, or versions, of the encryption key. You need to be able to choose whether or not the key can be deleted, mirrored to a failover unit, and by which users or groups it can be accessed. Your key manager should allow the administrator to change many of the key’s attributes at any time.

Key Use and Rollover (Activation through Post-Activation):

The key manager should allow an activated key to be retrieved by authorized systems and users for encryption or decryption processes. It should also seamlessly manage current and past instances of the encryption key. For example, if a key is rolled every year and the version is updated, then the key manager should retain previous versions of the key but dispense only the current instance for encryption processes. Previous versions can still be retrieved in order to decrypt data encrypted with such versions of the key. The key manager should use transport layer security (TLS) connections to securely deliver the encryption key to the system and user requesting it, which prevents the key from being compromised. The encryption key manager will also roll the key either through a previously established schedule or allow an administrator to manually roll the key.

Key Revocation and Back Up (Escrow):

An administrator should be able to use the key manager to revoke or deactivate a key so that it is no longer used for encryption requests. In certain cases the key can continue to be used to decrypt data previously encrypted with it, like old backups, but even that can be restricted. A revoked key can, if needed, be reactivated by an administrator, although this would be more an exception to the rule than common practice.

Key Deletion (Destruction):

If a key is no longer in use or if it has somehow been compromised, an administrator can choose to delete the key entirely from the key storage database of the encryption key manager. The key manager will remove it and all its instances, or just certain instances, completely and make the recovery of that key impossible (other than through a restore from a backup image). This should be available as an option if sensitive data is compromised in its encrypted state. If the key is deleted, the compromised data will be completely secure since it would be impossible to recreate the encryption key for that data.

Auditing and active monitoring of critical key management systems is a fundamental security concept for protecting critical assets like data in a key management solution. The key management administrator also needs to implement access controls to be sure that only the users and applications who should be accessing encryption keys are actually doing so. A general practice of separating encrypting keys across different departments or applications should be in place. For example, you may need to protect employee data in your HR system using an encryption key, but you wouldn’t want to use that same encryption key to protect sales data or where you might have credit cards. You need to segment the usage of encryption keys to particular data so that employees in HR are accessing HR data using one key and salespeople can access sales data using a different key.

You can see that there is a significant difference between a key storage device and an encryption key management solution. Remember to always look for NIST and FIPS 140-2 compliant solutions to meet compliance requirements and follow security best practices!

To learn more about encryption key management download our ebook on Encryption Key Management Simplified.

Encryption Key Management Simplified eBook
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Reflections on COMMON Annual Meeting and Exposition 2015

  
  
  
  

Last week, Townsend Security CEO Patrick Townsend and I made the trip to Anaheim, CA for the IBM COMMON User Group Annual Meeting and Exposition, a meeting that brought about one thousand IBM users from around the world together to learn and network. Both Patrick and I gave classes on IBM i security. This was a great opportunity for us to learn what the top security concerns of IBM i users are today, and what strategies are most common for implementing defense-in-depth security on the IBM i.

Two Factor Authentication on the IBM i First, it was great to learn that most IBM i users with sensitive data are encrypting. FIELDPROC, the field procedure exit point available on V7R1/V7R2 has made column-level encryption easier than ever, and many users are moving towards FIELDPROC-based encryption solutions. There was also greater interest in encryption key management, which is a critical part of any encryption solution.

One of the top questions we received regarding encryption and key management was, what are the benefits and challenges of IBM i native encryption libraries and key management? The IBM i native encryption and key management capabilities can be an easy way of protecting sensitive data on your IBM i. However, some companies who must encrypt and decrypt large amounts of data in short periods of time, or who must meet compliance regulations such as PCI-DSS or FFIEC, often run into performance issues when using the native encryption libraries and compliance issues if they must use a NIST-compliant key management solution. If a user needs to manage encryption keys in a multi-platform environment, then using a third-party key management solution that can manage keys in multiple operating systems and platforms is critical.

Greater interest in system logging was also evident. A strong system logging solution will collect security events in real time and detect a data breach as it happens. Many IBM i users were already using a log collection solution such as Splunk, AlienVault, or IBM’s QRadar SIEM solution; however, many users were also facing the challenge of collecting security events that are generated in many different formats, and need to be converted to a common format for collection, analysis, and alert management. The ability to convert these events and manage them in a cohesive way falls entirely on the capabilities of your system logging solution. We recommend IBM users focus on solutions, such as our Alliance LogAgent, that can convert logs from multiple formats into standards formats that can be read by your SIEM solution.

Lastly, Patrick presented on the importance of two-factor authentication on the IBM i. The importance of two-factor authentication has become more evident since many security experts deduced that some of the largest data breaches in the past few years perhaps could have been prevented using two-factor authentication. The Target and Anthem breaches are listed among these. Two-factor authentication is defined as an authentication method using two factors: something you have and something you know. If using two-factor authentication on the IBM i, anytime a user signs on, they will also receive a text or phone call providing them with a pin number they must enter in to their sign on client as well. Since hackers are becoming more and more adept at discovering a person’s password, two-factor authentication would stop a hacker from signing on as that person if they didn’t have access to their phone as well. Large companies such as Google and Apple are using these technologies already, and it won’t be long before use of two-factor authentication is a standard across all platforms.

Every year, COMMON gives us an opportunity to connect with IBM i users and some of our customers as well. We use this opportunity to spread the knowledge we have about the best security solutions available for the IBM i and learn from the community what new security needs coming down the line. If you weren’t able to attend COMMON this year, check out Patrick Townsend presentation on on two-factor authentication, available online here.

Two Factor Authentication on the IBM i

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Basics of Keeping Data Safe in the Cloud

  
  
  
  

Encryption & Key Management… why that ampersand is so important!

We frequently talk about a variety of different data security measures and the difficulty of making information truly secure in a multi-tenant environment. What steps are we taking to protect the most valuable assets we have as companies, such as our customer’s Personally Identifiable Information (PII)? Are we starting with the most critical steps in the process and then building out from there?  Let’s make sure we have the basics covered! eBook - Encryption Key Management Simplified

Encryption is the first step to keeping information secure from anyone who accesses it maliciously, it is also a clear compliance requirement and critical part of protecting data in any environment. Use industry standard encryption such as Advanced Encryption Standard (AES, also known as Rijndael) which is recognized world-wide as the leading standard for data encryption. Never use home-grown or non-standard encryption algorithms. Make sure your security partner will supply you with all of the sample code, binary libraries, applications, key retrieval and other tools you need to implement encryption and key management fast and easily. Whether your data resides in the cloud, in a virtual environment, or in your own data center; always make sure you are using the right type of encryption to protect it.

The second step to the security solution is Encryption Key Management. While encryption is critical to protecting data, it is only half of the equation. Most regulations require that encryption keys must be stored and managed away from the data they protect because storing encryption keys with the data they protect, or using non-standard methods of key storage, will not protect you in the event of a data breach. When encrypting information in your applications and databases, it is crucial to protect encryption keys from loss and securely managed from key creation, management, distribution, and archival or destruction (the full key lifecycle). In the past, key management used to be a complex and difficult task that required hardware and a team of security specialists to implement. Our key manager is available as a ready-to-use, easy-to-deploy solution that is compliant with the NIST FIPS 140-2 standard in a variety of instances:

In the Cloud - If you're running on Microsoft Azure, or in Amazon Web Services (AWS), the encryption key manager can run as a true cloud instance in a standard cloud or deploy in a virtual private cloud for added data protection for sensitive applications.

VMware - Businesses are able move their VMware infrastructure beyond traditional data centers and into the cloud with VMware’s vCloud.  By using the same FIPS 140-2 compliant software found in physical appliances, enterprises can provably meet compliance requirements with a VMware based encryption key manager running in the cloud.

A Cloud HSM is a physical appliance hosted in a secure cloud with real-time encryption key and access policy mirroring.  Dedicated HSMs are hosted in geographically dispersed data centers under an ITIL-based control environment and are independently validated for compliance against PCI DSS and SOC frameworks. No access is available to the cloud vendor or any unauthorized user.

A Hardware Security Module (HSM) is a physical appliance or security device that is protected and tamper evident. Built for high resiliency and redundancy it has hot swappable RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) disc drives, dual power supplies, dual network interfaces, and is deployed in your IT data center. Cloud applications can connect to a remote HSM over a secure, encrypted connection.

Do you have the basics covered? If you are unsure about the status of your defense-in-depth strategy to data security, contact one of the experts on the Townsend Security team. We have a variety of resources to help you answer your most pressing questions and a variety of solutions to make sure you are protecting your data the best way possible. At Townsend Security we also take a very different philosophy and approach:

  • We think that when you buy an encryption key manager, you should be able to easily deploy the solution, get all your encryption projects done properly, and have very affordable and predictable costs.
  • We understand that we live in a world where budget matters to our customers, so we do not charge client-side application or connection fees.
  • We know that IT resources are limited and have done a huge amount of work to make our solutions easy with out-of-the-box integrations and simplified deployments. We also provide ready-made client-side applications, encryption libraries, source code samples, as well as SDKs for developers who need them.
Check out this eBook for more information: 

Encryption Key Management Simplified eBook Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Three Things to Know about PGP Encryption & the IBM z

  
  
  
  

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) Encryption is a solid path to provable and defensible security, and PGP Command Line sets the standard for IBM enterprise customers.

Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) encryption is one of the most widely deployed whole file encryption technologies that has stood the test of time among the world’s largest financial, medical, industrial, and services companies. Download the PGP z podcast It works on all of the major operating system platforms and makes it easy to deploy strong encryption to protect data assets and file exchange. PGP is also well recognized and accepted across a broad number of compliance regulations as a secure way to protect sensitive data as it is in transit to your trading partners. PGP encryption can help businesses meet PCI-DSS, HIPAA/HITECH, SOX, and FISMA compliance regulations.

Here are three key things to know about PGP encryption for your IBM System z Mainframe, and how to discuss them with your technology providers:

1) Always encrypt and decrypt sensitive data on the platform where it is created. This is the only way to satisfy regulatory security and privacy notification requirements.

Moving data to a PC for encryption and decryption tasks greatly increases the chances of loss and puts your most sensitive data at risk.  In order not to defeat your data security goals it is important to encrypt and decrypt data directly on the platform.

2) The best PGP encryption solutions manage PGP keys directly on the platform without the need for an external PC system, or key generation on a PC.

Using a PC to generate or manage PGP keys exposes the keys on the most vulnerable system. The loss of PGP keys may trigger expensive and time-consuming privacy notification requirements and force the change of PGP keys with all of your trading partners.

3) The best data security solutions will provide you with automation tools that help minimize additional programming and meet your integration requirements.

Most Enterprise customers find that the cost of the software for an encryption solution is small compared to the cost of integrating the solution into their business applications. Data must be extracted from business applications, encrypted using PGP, transmitted to a trading partner, archived for future access, and tracked for regulatory audit. When receiving an encrypted file from a trading partner the file must be decrypted, transferred to an IBM z library, and processed into the business application. All of these operations have to be automated to avoid expensive and time-consuming manual intervention.

While the IBM System z Mainframe has always had a well-earned reputation for security, recently IBM modernized and extended their high-end enterprise server, the IBM System z Mainframe with the new z13 model. With full cross-platform support you can encrypt and decrypt data on the IBM Mainframe regardless of its origination or destination.

For over a decade Townsend Security has been bringing PGP encryption to Mainframe customers to help them solve some of the most difficult problems with encryption. As partners with Symantec we provide IBM enterprise customers running IBM System z and IBM i (AS/400, iSeries) with the same strong encryption solution that runs on Windows, Linux, Mac, Unix, and other platforms.

With the commercial PGP implementation from Symantec comes full support for OpenPGP standard, which really make a difference for enterprise businesses. Here are just a few of the things we’ve done with PGP to embrace the IBM System z Mainframe architecture:

    • Native z/OS Batch operation
    • Support for USS operation
    • Text mode enhancements for z/OS datasets
    • Integrated EBCDIC to ASCII conversion using built-in IBM facilities
    • Simplified IBM System z machine and partition licensing
    • Support for self-decrypting archives targeting Windows, Mac, and Linux!
    • A rich set of working JCL samples
    • As always we offer a free 30-day PGP evaluation on your own IBM Mainframe

PGP Command Line is the gold standard for whole file encryption, and you don’t have to settle for less. When you base your company reputation on something mission-critical like PGP encryption, you deserve the comfort of knowing that there’s a support team there ready to stand behind you.

Listen to the podcast for more in-depth information and a discussion on how PGP meets compliance regulations, and how Townsend Security, the only Symantec partner on the IBM i (AS/400) platform as well as the IBM z mainframe providing PGP Command Line 9, can help IBM enterprise customers with defensible data security!

 

Download the Podcast for PGP z


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Introducing Key Connection for Encryptionizer

  
  
  
  

Easier Encryption and Key Management for SQL Server Standard & Web Editions

Your IT environment is ever changing. As technologies evolve, you constantly have to upgrade systems and migrate to new platforms to accommodate these changes. This often results in complex IT environments that are comprised of multiple platforms and operating systems, and data located in disparate locations. Protecting sensitive data in a multi-platform environment that’s made up of both old and new technologies can be one of the most frustrating aspects of data security. White Paper: Key Management in a Multi-Platform Environment

One of Townsend Security’s core missions is to help customers protect sensitive data, regardless of where that data resides, in a cohesive way. One area where we’ve seen the need to improve upon this is around encrypting data in Standard versions of Microsoft SQL Server. Because Microsoft does not provide transparent data encryption (TDE) capability on SQL Server Standard and Web editions, Microsoft customers using these older editions struggle with implementing easy and fast transparent encryption.

In order to simplify the encryption process for Standard and Web Edition users, we have partnered with NetLib, a database encryption solution provider that supports easy and automatic folder, file, and application encryption in Windows as well as database and column level encryption for all Microsoft SQL Server editions. NetLib Encryptionizer easily protects data in SQL Server (2000-2014), Standard, Web, Workgroup and Express Editions. NetLib provides column level encryption as well using triggers and views without the need to write SQL statements or any other development.  

NetLib’s customers choose NetLib Encryptionizer for their FIPS 140-2 compliant encryption solution, for which they require FIPS 140-2 compliant encryption key management as well. As a critical step in our partnership, Townsend Security built Key Connection for Encryptionizer, a no-cost plug-in module that allows Encryptionizer customers to easily secure encryption keys using Townsend Security’s Alliance Key Manager.  

System audits and logging are critical to detecting and alerting you to malicious activity in your systems. Key Connection for Encryptionizer allows users to fully audit the encryption and key management process. Encryptionizer audit logging of user-file interaction as well as audit logging of the key life cycle in Alliance Key Manager provides a comprehensive logging service. Additionally, encrypting data on SQL Server Standard and Web editions typically involves some level of development. With NetLib Encryptionizer, users can encrypt data using a simple point-and-click configuration.

Townsend Security is proud to partner with NetLib to provide an easier method to encrypting data in Microsoft SQL Server Standard and Web editions. To learn more about managing encryption keys for data encryption in complex environments, download the white paper, Key Management in the Multi-Platform Environment.

White P


 





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Overcome Security Challenges with Your VMware Environment

  
  
  
  

Prioritize Your Data Security Plan and Encryption Strategy

New Call-to-action For many businesses, moving to the cloud means storing or processing credit card numbers, financial information, health care data, and other personally identifiable information (PII) in a virtual, shared environment. When using an environment that is inherently less secure, how does an organization meet industry data security requirements and prevent unwanted access to sensitive data?

In order to achieve a comprehensive data security plan in a VMware environment, organizations should consider the following steps:

Take Inventory of Your Sensitive Data

Every data security project should start by making an inventory of sensitive data in your IT environment. If you do not know where to start, first consider the compliance regulations you fall under. For example, do you process credit cards? If so, you must locate and encrypt primary account numbers (PAN), expiration date, cardholder name, and service codes where they are processed, transmitted, or stored in order to meet PCI compliance. If your company is a financial institution, include Non-Public Information (NPI) about consumers, and if you are in the medical segment, you must also locate all Protected Health Information (PHI) for patients. Finally, locate all data that is considered Personally Identifiable Information (PII) which is any information that can uniquely identify an individual (social security number, phone number, email address, etc.). Business plans, computer source code, and other digital assets should make the list, too.

Once you have a list of the kinds of information that you should protect, find and document the places this information is stored. This will include databases in your virtual machines, unstructured data in content management systems, log files, and everywhere else sensitive data comes to rest or can be found in the clear.

After you have a full inventory of your sensitive data, prioritize your plan of attack to secure that information with encryption and protect your encryption keys with a key management solution. The most sensitive information, such as credit card numbers, medical or financial data, is more valuable to cyber criminals and should be encrypted first. Creating this map of where your sensitive data resides and prioritizing which data to encrypt is not only a requirement for many compliance regulations, but will help to focus your resources as well.  

What to do:

  • Define sensitive data for your organization.
  • Using manual and automated procedures, make an inventory of all of the places you process and store sensitive data.
  • Create a prioritized plan on how you will encrypt the sensitive information affected by compliance regulations.

Implement Encryption and Encryption Key Management

While encryption is critical to protecting data, it is only half of the equation. Your key management solution will determine how effective your data security strategy ultimately is. When encrypting information in your applications and databases, it is crucial to protect encryption keys from loss. Storing encryption keys with the data they protect, or using non-standard methods of key storage, will not protect you in the event of a data breach.

For businesses who are already encrypting data, the most common cause of an audit failure is improper storage and protection of the encryption keys. Doing encryption key management right is often the hardest part of securing data. For this reason, it is paramount to choose a key management solution that is compliant and tested against the highest standards:

  • Your VMware key management solution should be based on FIPS 140-2 compliant key management software (find out if your key management vendor offers FIPS 140-2 compliant key management on the NIST website look it up on the NIST web site.
  • A key management solution should also conform to the industry standard Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP) as published by OASIS. Ask for the KMIP Interoperability Report from the KMIP testing process.

Encrypting sensitive data on your virtual machine protects your data at the source, and is the only way to definitively prevent unwanted access to sensitive data. With VMware environments, businesses that need to protect sensitive data can use encryption and encryption key management to secure data, comply with industry security standards, protect against data loss, and help prevent data breaches.

What to look for:

  • Use industry standard encryption algorithms such as AES to protect your sensitive data. Avoid non-standard encryption methods.
  • Your encryption solution should support installation in any application workgroup that you define for your trusted applications. Be sure your encryption vendor explains any limitations in the VMware deployment.
  • Your encryption key management solution should support deployment in a separate VMware security workgroup. Ideally, the key management solution will include internal firewall support to complement the VMware virtual firewall implementation.
  • Your key management solution is a critical part of your VMware security implementation. It should support active collection and monitoring of audit logs and operating system logs. These logs should integrate with your log collection and SIEM active monitoring systems.

As your IT environment evolves, make sure your key management evolves with you. In addition to support for VMware, be sure your key management solution is available as a hardware security module (HSM), as a Cloud HSM subscription, and as a native cloud application on major cloud service provider platforms such as Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure. Even if you do not have these non-VMware platforms today, it is important to consider that the evolution of your IT infrastructure is inevitable. The encryption and key management solutions you deploy today in your VMware data center should be prepared to move to cloud or hosted platforms quickly and seamlessly. A merger, acquisition, rapid growth, competitive challenges, and technology advances can force the need to migrate your solutions to new platforms.

For more detailed information, check out our eBook on VMware Encryption – 9 Critical Components of a Defensible Encryption Strategy:

VMware Encryption eBook

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Understanding Encryption and Key Management for VMware

  
  
  
  

How to implement solutions that are based on compliance standards and meet security best practices.

As more and more Enterprise businesses move into virtual and cloud environments, they face challenges and security issues in these multi-tenancy situations. VMware customers benefit from the many operational and cost efficiencies provided by VMware virtualization technologies both in traditional IT infrastructure and in cloud environments. VMware Resource Kit for Encryption and Key Management As VMware customers deploy data encryption solutions as a part of their defense-in-depth strategy, the need for compliant encryption key management can present barriers to a good encryption implementation. It is possible to deploy a proper encryption key management solution within the VMware infrastructure without the need for traditional hardware security modules (HSMs) when this approach is appropriate to the security needs of the organization.

Here is some high level guidance on how to deploy and protect a solid encryption and key management solution for VMware within your virtual or cloud environment. While these recommendations are general in nature (actual VMware deployments will use different VMware applications and architectures to meet specific user, application, and security needs) they can provide a good roadmap.

Seven General VMware Recommendations

1. Identify and Document Trusted and Un-Trusted Applications

Properly identifying application groups based on the level of trust is critical for a secure implementation of virtualized applications and encryption key management services. Create and isolate a management cluster for your core VMware applications such as vSphere, vShield, etc. Identify application groups and their associated level of trust, and isolate applications into appropriate workgroups. Avoid mixing trusted and untrusted applications in a workgroup.

You should consider creating a security workgroup to contain your third party security applications such as encryption key management, authentication services, active directory, system logging, and other applications whose primary function is to assist in securing your applications in your VMware environment.

In preparation for properly securing these environments, create an inventory of all Virtual Machines managed in each workgroup. For each workgroup and virtual machine, identify the security controls that will be required for each one (network segmentation, storage segmentation, system logging, active monitoring, etc.). VMware flow tools can assist with this documentation.

2. Restrict Physical Access

Fundamental to all IT security implementations is proper security of the physical environment. This means proper physical security controls and physical monitoring of the data center as well as good auditing and procedural controls. These physical controls should also apply to access of VMware management and security applications. You can look to the PCI Data Security Standards and guidance for information on appropriate physical controls. You can also refer to standard security guidance in SOC 2 and SOC 3 assessments for information on physical controls. When deploying on a cloud platform it is always a good idea to ask the Cloud Security Provider (CSP) for a copy of the PCI letter of attestation, or an SOC 2 / SOC 3 report.

3. Isolate Security Functions

Because security applications are often a target of cyber-criminals, you should isolate them into their own security workgroup and implement the highest level of VMware security. Only trusted VMware administrators should have access rights to the encryption key management solution, system logs, and audit reports. Be sure to actively monitor access to and use of all encryption key management, key retrieval, and encryption services.

4. Change VMware Default Passwords

Review all VMware applications used to secure and manage your VMware environment and change the default passwords as recommended by VMware. The failure to change default passwords is one of the most common causes of security breaches.

5. Implement Network Segmentation

Network segmentation is easy to accomplish with VMware network management and security applications and you should implement network segmentation to isolate applications that process sensitive information from applications that do not require as high a level of trust. Additionally, you should provide network segmentation for all third party security applications such as your encryption and key management solution. Network segmentation should include all high availability and business recovery infrastructure. Do not rely on virtual network segmentation alone; use firewalls that are capable of properly securing virtual networks.

6. Implement Defense in Depth

The VMware management and security applications provide for a high level of security and monitoring. They also provide hooks and integration with third party security applications that provide system log collection, active monitoring, intrusion detection, etc. Encryption is a critical part of a defense-in-depth strategy, and protecting encryption keys is the most important part of an encryption strategy. Regardless of the operating systems in your application Virtual Machines, your solution should provide encryption key management, key retrieval, and encryption services for your business applications and databases running in your VMware infrastructure.

7. Monitor VMware Administrative Activity

Use an appropriate SIEM solution to collect VMware application and ESXi hypervisor system logs and perform active monitoring. The log collection and SIEM active monitoring solutions should be isolated into a security workgroup that contains other third party security applications such as Townsend Security’s Alliance Key Manager.

For additional information on securing Alliance Key Manager for VMware, our encryption key management solution, request the VMware Resource Kit containing the Guidance Document and other valuable resources:

Resource Kit: Encryption and Key Management in VMware

As solutions and implementations vary a great deal, always consult with a security specialist and compliance auditor for specific guidelines for your industry and environment! Just contact us to get started!

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Basics of the EU Data Protection Working Party

  
  
  
  

Article 29 Security Guidelines on Data Protection



The Article 29 Working Party is composed of representatives of the national data protection authorities (DPA), the European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS), and the European Commission. It is a very important platform for cooperation, and its main tasks are to:

  1. Provide expert advice from the national level to the European Commission on data protection matters.
  2. Promote the uniform application of Directive 95/46 in all Member States of the EU, as well as in Norway, Liechtenstein and Iceland.
  3. Advise the Commission on any European Community law (so called first pillar), that affects the right to protection of personal data.


Download the EU Data Privacy White Paper

Under EU law, personal data can only be gathered legally under strict conditions, for a legitimate purpose. Furthermore, persons or organisations which collect and manage personal information must protect it from misuse and must respect certain rights of the data owners which are guaranteed by EU law.

Every day within the EU, businesses, public authorities and individuals transfer vast amounts of personal data across borders. Conflicting data protection rules in different countries would disrupt international exchanges. Individuals might also be unwilling to transfer personal data abroad if they were uncertain about the level of protection in other countries.

Therefore, common EU rules have been established to ensure personal data enjoys a high standard of protection everywhere in the EU. The EU's Data Protection Directive also foresees specific rules for the transfer of personal data outside the EU to ensure the best possible protection of sensitive data when it is exported abroad.

In order to help address these EU objectives, Patrick Townsend, Founder and CEO of Townsend Security recommends the following data protection best practices:

  • Encrypt Data at Rest
    Make a full inventory of all sensitive personal information that you collect and store. Use strong encryption to protect this data on servers, PCs, laptops, tablets, mobile devices, and on backups.
  • Use Industry Standard Encryption
    Advanced Encryption Standard (AES, also known as Rijndael) is recognized world-wide as the leading standard for data encryption.
  • Use Strong Encryption Keys
    Always use cryptographically secure 128-bit or 256- bit AES encryption keys and never use passwords as encryption keys or the basis for creating encryption keys.
  • Protect Encryption Keys from Loss
    Encryption keys must be stored away from the data they protect.  Keys must be securely managed and should be compliant with the industry standards such as NIST FIPS 140-2 which is recognized and accepted worldwide.
  • Change Encryption Keys Regularly
    Change your encryption keys on a quarterly or semi-annual basis. Using one encryption key for a long period of time can expose you to a breach notification for historical data.
  • Use Strong, Industry Standard Hash Algorithms
    Never use MD5 or other weaker hash methods. Use the SHA-256 or SHA-512 methods for your hash requirements.
  • Use Keys or Salt with Your Hashes
    You can use the Hashed Message Authentication Code (HMAC) method with an encryption key or use a strong encryption key under the protection of a key manager as the salt for the hash method.

For more detailed information on these recommendations, download the white paper on the "EU Data Privacy Protections and Encryption":

Click to Request the EU Data Privacy White Paper
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Data Protection in the Cloud & PCI DSS - Logs and Log Monitoring (Part 3)

  
  
  
  

This is the third part in our series looking at recent announcements by Amazon, Microsoft and other cloud service providers regarding new encryption and key management services. Let’s talk about log collection and active monitoring as a security best practice, and as a requirement to meet PCI DSS security requirements. Since the PCI DSS guidelines implement common security best practices, they are a good starting point for evaluating the security of any application and platform that processes sensitive data. Following the practice of the first part of this series we will use the PCI document “PCI DSS Cloud Computing Guidelines, Version 2.0” as our reference point, and add in some other sources of security best practices. Even if you don’t have to meet PCI data security requirements, this should be helpful when evaluating your security posture in the cloud.

Download Whitepaper on PCI Data Security

Collecting system logs and actively monitoring them is a core component of every cyber security recommendation. Cybercriminals often gain access to IT systems and go undetected for weeks or months. This gives them the ability to work on compromising systems and stealing data over time. Active monitoring is important in the attempt to detect and thwart this compromise.

Here is what PCI says about active monitoring in Section 10 of the PCI DSS (emphasis added):

Review logs and security events for all system components to identify anomalies or suspicious activity.

Many breaches occur over days or months before being detected. Checking logs daily minimizes the amount of time and exposure of a potential breach. Regular log reviews by personnel or automated means can identify and proactively address unauthorized access to the cardholder data environment. The log review process does not have to be manual. The use of log harvesting, parsing, and alerting tools can help facilitate the process by identifying log events that need to be reviewed.

In recognition of the importance of ongoing, active monitoring the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) provides this guidance in their Special Publication 800-137 “Information Security Continuous Monitoring (ISCM)” guidance:

The Risk Management Framework (RMF) developed by NIST, describes a disciplined and structured process that integrates information security and risk management activities into the system development life cycle. Ongoing monitoring is a critical part of that risk management process. In addition, an organization’s overall security architecture and accompanying security program are monitored to ensure that organization-wide operations remain within an acceptable level of risk, despite any changes that occur. Timely, relevant, and accurate information is vital, particularly when resources are limited and agencies must prioritize their efforts.

And active monitoring is a component of the SANS Top 20 security recommendations:

Collect, manage, and analyze audit logs of events that could help detect, understand, or recover from an attack.

Deficiencies in security logging and analysis allow attackers to hide their location, malicious software, and activities on victim machines. Even if the victims know that their systems have been compromised, without protected and complete logging records they are blind to the details of the attack and to subsequent actions taken by the attackers. Without solid audit logs, an attack may go unnoticed indefinitely and the particular damages done may be irreversible.

Because of poor or nonexistent log analysis processes, attackers sometimes control victim machines for months or years without anyone in the target organization knowing, even though the evidence of the attack has been recorded in unexamined log files.

Deploy a SIEM (Security Incident and Event Management) or log analytic tools for log aggregation and consolidation from multiple machines and for log correlation and analysis.

This is why actively collecting and monitoring system and application logs is critical for your security strategy.

Implementing this critical security control in a cloud environment presents some special challenges. Here is what the PCI cloud guidance says:

Additionally, the ability to maintain an accurate and complete audit trail may require logs from all levels of the infrastructure, requiring involvement from both the CSP and the client. For example, the CSP could manage system-level, operating-system, and hypervisor logs, while the client configures logging for their own VMs and applications. In this scenario, the ability to associate various log files into meaningful events would require correlation of client-controlled logs and those controlled by the CSP.

It is not enough to collect logs from a few selected points in your cloud application environment. You need to collect all of the logs from all of the components that you deploy and use in your cloud application. This is because the effectiveness of active monitoring depends on the correlation of events across your entire application, database, and network and this includes the cloud providers systems and infrastructure. Here is what ISACA says about security event correlation:

Correlation of event data is critical to uncover security breaches because security incidents are made up of a series of events that occur at various touch points throughout a network--a many-to-one process. Unlike network management, which typically is exception-based or a one-to-one process, security management is far more complex. An attack typically touches a network at multiple points and leaves marks or breadcrumbs at each. By finding and following that breadcrumb trail, a security analyst can detect and hopefully prevent the attack.

Your encryption key management system is one of those critical system components that must be monitored and whose events should be aggregated into a unified view. Key management logs would include encryption key establishment and configuration, encryption key access and use, and operating system logs of every component of the key management service. You should be able to collect and monitor logs from all parts of your applications and cloud platform.

Unfortunately, current key management services from cloud providers only provide a very limited level of access to critical component logs. You might have access to a limited audit trail of your own access to encryption keys, but no access to the key service system logs, HSM access logs, HSM audit logs, or HSM operating system logs. Without access to the logs in these components it is not possible for you to implement an effective log collection and active monitoring strategy. You are working in the dark, and without full access to all logs on all components of your cloud key management service you can’t comply with security best practices for log collection, correlation, and active monitoring.

Since key management systems are always in scope for PCI audit and are extensions of your application environment it is difficult to see how these new cloud key management services can meet PCI DSS requirements for log collection and monitoring as currently implemented.

Does this mean you can’t implement security best practices for key management in the cloud? I don’t think so. There are multiple vendors, including us (see below), who offer cloud key management solutions that provide full access to key management, configuration, key usage, application, and operating system logs.  You can deploy a key management service that fully supports security best practices for log collection and monitoring.

In part 4 of this series we’ll look at the topic of key custody and multi-tenancy and how it affects the security of your key management solution in the cloud.

Patrick


Resources

Alliance Key Manager for AWS

Alliance Key Manager for Azure

Alliance Key Manager for VMware and vCloud

Alliance Key Manager for Drupal

 

Alliance Key Manager for IBM Power Sysems

Alliance Key Manager Colud

download the Whitepaper: Meet the Challenges of PCI Compliance

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