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Data breaches are often avoidable...

  
  
  
  

Many companies, however, do not know how they are being attacked.

Today we want to expose and explore the ways bad actors gain access to, and exploit, your sensitive data.  Follow along as we look at the costs, the causes, and the preventative measures of data breaches. You can click on the info graphic to download additional resources!

Data Breach Infographic

Don't forget to click on the info graphic to request additional data security resources!

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Why is Encryption & Key Management So Important?

  
  
  
  

Shayna at SecureWorld Seattle 2014

More Questions from the Tradeshow Floor (Part 2)

In our last blog we touched on a few of the questions asked at events we attended in November.  There were so many great conversations that I’ve decided to share a few more!Session on encryption and key management

With the various platforms that I can deploy an encryption key manager in, how do I know which one is right for me?

There are several factors that will come in to play when deciding where you deploy your key management:

  • Compliance regulations that you need to meet can be a factor in whether you deploy an Hardware Security Module (HSM) or a cloud HSM or a virtualized instance. If you are working with an auditor or going through a QSA audit, you'll want to have a conversation with them to understand their expectation from a compliance point of view around where you deploy your encryption key manager.
  • Risk tolerance will also come into play. You may have a security group within your organization with strong feelings about how to deploy encryption key management and how to mitigate risk. If you have large amounts of sensitive data to protect you might decide to deploy an HSM in your secure data center. If you're dealing with a very small amount of data and you do not process credit cards or personally identifiable information, your risk assessment may indicate a cloud deployment.
  • Budget is certainly always a factor to consider. It is important to consider the cost benefits of security however, we all understand that leaving our data in the clear is no longer an option. It is a matter of understanding your industry regulations and risk assessment, then deciding what encryption and key management to deploy.

While they are generally the most secure solution, Hardware Security Modules (HSMs) can be more expensive than a virtual environment, dedicated cloud instance, or virtual private cloud. Once you look at all the factors that affect your company, we will be there with the right solution that will work for your needs.

Tell me more about all these different options you have for the Alliance Key Management Solution… are they all going to help me meet compliance requirements?

There are still our original hardware security modules (HSMs) and now there are new options for deployment of cloud-based HSMs, virtual appliances (VMware), and true cloud instances of encryption and key management in AWS and Microsoft Azure.

  • Hardware Security Module (HSM) is a physical appliance or security device that is protected and tamper evident. Built for high resiliency and redundancy it has hot swappable rated disc drives, dual power supplies, dual network interfaces, and is deployed in your IT data center.
  • Cloud HSM is a physical appliance hosted in a secure cloud with real-time encryption key and access policy mirroring.  Dedicated HSMs are hosted in geographically dispersed data centers under an ITIL-based control environment and are independently validated for compliance against PCI DSS and SOC frameworks. No access is available to the cloud vendor or any unauthorized user.
  • Virtual Appliances are the exact same key management solution - the same binary software that runs inside the hardware HSM - available as a VMware instance.
  • In the Cloud - If you're running on Microsoft Windows Azure, vCloud, or in Amazon Web Services (AWS),the encryption key manager can run as a true cloud instance in a standard cloud or deploy in a virtual private cloud for added data protection for sensitive applications.

Because encryption and key management is so important, we offer all of the options listed above as NIST and FIPS 140-2 compliant solutions.

How is Alliance Key Manager Priced?

We have a wide set of options for our customers, and are dedicated to helping find affordable solutions. We have perpetual license or subscription options for classic HSMs, Cloud HSM, and virtualized environments. Our cloud offerings are true usage-based subscriptions, so if you're used to deploying in Amazon Web Services or Windows Azure, our encryption & key management solutions will fit that same strategy for pricing.  

We really believe that the encryption should go everywhere you need it to go! Your key management should work across a wide set of application environments, and it must be affordable, so that we can all get where we need to be in terms of protecting sensitive data. Regardless of where your data is or what platform you are using, there's a key management solution that can work for you!

How can Encryption and Key Management improve my bottom line?

Whether you choose a designated hardware security module (HSM), something designed specifically for virtualized environments (VMware), or data storage in the cloud, encryption and key management solutions can help you:

  • Gain competitive advantage and build loyalty by protecting your customers data against access by unauthorized users
  • Reduce hardware costs by leveraging virtual environments in the cloud
  • Significantly improve your data security strategy while satisfying data compliance and privacy requirements

Overall, data encryption offers many benefits and provides solid protection against potential threats or theft. In addition to the many benefits, encryption is also efficient, easy to use, and affordable!

What sets Townsend Security apart from other key management vendors?

We want to protect data and make sure encryption is available everywhere you need it, so at Townsend Security we have a very different philosophy and approach:

  • We think that when you buy an encryption key manager, you should be able to easily deploy the solution, get all your encryption projects done properly, and have very affordable and predictable costs.
  • We understand that we live in a world where budget matters to our customers, so we do not charge client-side fees.  
  • We know that IT resources are limited and have done a huge amount of work to make our solutions easy with out-of-the-box integrations, simplified deployments, and also provide along with our solution ready-made client-side applications, encryption libraries, source code samples, as well as SDKs for developers who need them to get their projects done very quickly.

Want to learn more about how to properly secure your data and protect your business against a data breach? Download our eBook “The Encryption Guide”:

The Encryption Guide eBook


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So, What is Encryption & Key Management Anyway?

  
  
  
  

James and Shayna at PASS Summit 2014

Questions from the Tradeshow Floor  (Part 1)

November was a very busy month for tradeshows, conferences, and speaking engagements for the team at Townsend Security.  We love getting out to meet our current and potential customers and other than “giant Tetris”, our favorite things are the great questions we get asked at events. Giant Tetris at Re:Invent

What if I lose an encryption key?

While the fear of losing a key is legitimate, the keystone of a successful encryption solution is encryption key management, which is the primary solution for managing, storing, and most importantly, protecting encryption keys. Unlike a “key storage” solution, a cryptographic encryption key manager is typically a NIST FIPS 140-2 compliant hardware security module (HSM) or virtual machine in the cloud that manages key storage, creation, deletion, retrieval, rotation, and archival. Many key management solutions are also produced in pairs, with one located in a different geographical location for high availability. If doing encryption key management right, you will never lose an encryption key.

Is there more to encryption key management than just storing my encryption keys?

There is far more to encryption key management than just storing the encryption key somewhere. Generally, a key storage device only provides storage of the encryption key, and you need to create the key elsewhere. Also, just storing your encryption keys “somewhere” doesn’t work very well for compliance regulations. With an encryption key manager, there is a whole set of management capabilities and a suite of functions that provide dual control, creates separation of duties, implements two factor authentication, generates system logs, and performs audit activities, along with managing the key life cycle. Beyond storing the encryption key, a cryptographic key manager manages the entire key life cycle. Some of the most important functions the key management administrator performs are the actual creation and management of the encryption keys. The keys are generated and stored securely and then go through the full cycle to become active, go into use, expire, retire (post-activation), and then be backed up in escrow, and then deleted (the “destruction” phase).  There is a very real need, and very specific compliance regulations & guidelines that require you to store and manage your encryption keys away from the data that they protect.

How easy is securing and protecting sensitive data on SharePoint?

The path to implementing encryption and key management for SharePoint is one of the most straightforward and easy paths. Townsend Security’s Alliance Encryption Key Management solution fully supports automatic encryption in SQL Server and integrates with ease.  SQL Server Enterprise and higher editions (starting with 2008) fully implement extensible key management (EKM) and encryption to protect data. Installing encryption on that platform is the first step. Administrators can then leverage the automatic encryption capabilities of SQL Server with only a few commands and no application changes.

What impact does encryption have on SQL Server performance?

Encryption will always be a CPU intensive task and there will be some performance impact due to extra processing power needed for encryption and decryption. However, the Microsoft encryption libraries as well as the .NET environment are highly optimized for performance. We have always seen very good performance on SQL Server and the native encryption capabilities that it provides. Microsoft reports that Transparent Data Encryption (TDE) on SQL Server may cost you 2-4% penalty in performance, and our own tests show similar results that fall on the 2% end of things.

Is there any limit to the number of servers that I can hook up to your encryption key manager?

There are no restrictions, and no license constraints on our encryption & key management solution. We don't meter or count the number of client-side platforms that connect to our Alliance Key Manager, so you can hook up as many client side applications, servers, and processors as you need to. This is one of the things I think is different about how we approach encryption and key management with our customers. We also know the applications you are running today may not be the applications you need to be running tomorrow and we really want you to deploy encryption to all your sensitive data and scale up when & where you need it.

I am collecting data in Drupal. What data do I need to encrypt?

Organizations starting an encryption project always have this question on their minds. It is a simple question, but can be hard to answer. Generally speaking, you should encrypt any information that alone, or when combined with other information, can identify a unique, individual person. This is called Personally Identifying Information, or PII. This should be your starting point, but you may need to address other information depending on the compliance regulations you must meet.

  • PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) applies to anyone, public or private, who take credit cards for payment. Primary account numbers (PAN) are specifically addressed.
  • HIPAA/HITECH Act requires the medical segment (and any business associate) provide data protection for protected health information (PHI) of patients. 

  • GLBA/FFIEC applies to the financial industry (bank, credit union, trading organization, credit reporting agency) for protecting all sensitive consumer information. 

  • Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) applies to public traded companies for sensitive data of personally identifiable information (PII).


In addition to these compliance regulations, the Cloud Security Alliance (CSA) has created the Cloud Controls Matrix (CCM) specifically designed to provide fundamental security principles to guide cloud vendors and to assist prospective cloud customers in assessing the overall security risk of a cloud provider.

We encourage all developers to check out Townsend Security’s Developer Program, it allows developers to design strong and secure applications from the ground up using NIST compliant AES encryption and FIPS 140-2 compliant encryption key management.

Developer Program Encryption


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XML, Web Services, and Encryption

  
  
  
  

Real-time, Low-cost, Business Integration When and Where You Need It! 

Do you need a complete and affordable solution for implementing XML web services on your IBM i? Need a solution that won’t disrupt your existing applications and database so you can easily implement web services without complicated API programming or the deployment of external servers? Our Alliance XML solution includes all of the communications, XML parsing, data translation, and application integration components that you need. You can create XML documents from your existing database files and securely send them to remote web servers, and you can receive XML documents directly on your IBM i and process the data into your applications. XML, Web Services, Encryption

QSA auditors and other security professionals focus on the protection of sensitive data after it traverses the Internet and then lands in a database on a hard disk drive. You need a solution that provides security at every level of processing and protects data in transit using session encryption. When sending or receiving XML documents Alliance XML can use the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol for strong encryption of the transferred data. The Alliance XML TLS support is based on the IBM Digital Certificate Manager and related IBM APIs for TLS sessions. This gives you an implementation that is compatible with native IBM i security. As an additional layer of security the Alliance XML HTTP servers provide IP address controls so that only known clients can use the servers.

When receiving XML documents with sensitive data you can enable field level encryption to protect the data. For example, if you receive a document with a credit card number or social security number, you can use strong encryption of the data to protect it before it is written to your database table. User APIs provide a means of decrypting the data so that it can be used in your RPG and Cobol applications.

The web protocols HTTPS and FTPS provide for the ability to encrypt the data in transit, and Secure Shell SSH also provides strong encryption. But after the data reaches the end point of its journey it lands in a database somewhere, and it is often exposed to loss at that point. I believe that’s why security auditors put emphasis on making sure that data is encrypted when it hits it’s destination.

Many companies have implemented web services in combination with the XML data standard to take advantage of low cost, real time integration with their customers and vendors. When you combine the ubiquity of the web HTTPS protocol with the W3C XML standard you get a powerful incentive to use this platform for business integration.

Care should be given to what happens to data when it leaves the realm of encrypted transit and lands on server hard drives. The right thing to do is encrypt sensitive data at the very beginning. This means that the tools you are using have to support encryption as a natural part of the process of converting XML data. Standard XML processing tools such as Xerces and Xpath do not have built-in encryption. The same is true for XML toolkits and APIs provided by IBM, Microsoft, and others. This leaves it to developers to try to intercept data after it is transformed from XML and before it lands in a database table or on a hard drive. That’s a real challenge.
 XML and Web Services

In our Alliance XML/400 web services product on the IBM platform we built encryption right into the data transformation process. Alliance XML/400 customers can protect sensitive data by enabling the encryption option on a translation map. The solution does the rest. The data is encrypted before insertion into the database and there is no exposure as the data lands in the database on the hard drive. Our customers are taking advantage of this feature to meet PCI and other compliance regulations.

Encryption can help protect against another common threat, too. At the annual PCI SSC standards council meeting a few years ago, forensics expert Chris Novak of Verizon talked about how more than 75 percent of data loss events begin with a well known weakness that hasn’t been patched, and half of these are based on SQL injection attacks, this is still true today. With SQL injection, the attack on your servers starts with bad data inserted into a database in the clear, leaving open a later exploit. There are ways to prevent SQL injection through programming techniques, but encryption will also help defeat them.

Will encrypting your data provide all of the security protection you need? No, but it should be a major part of your defense-in-depth strategy to protect sensitive data.  

To view a replay of a webinar we presented on XML & Web Services, click below

Request the Webinar:  XML and Web Services  

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Encryption Key Management in SQL Server

  
  
  
  

Beyond meeting compliance regulations, it is the right thing to do!

In the past, encryption has had a reputation for being difficult to do, complex, and time consuming, we hope to show you how that has changed. If you are new at protecting data in Microsoft SQL Server environments, generally compliance regulations are what drive an encryption project.   Download the Webinar - Just Click!  

Since it wasn’t thought of as something that improved the “Bottom line” by increasing revenue or decreasing expenses, encryption has historically been a project solely driven by the need to meet compliance regulations. There are a large variety of compliance regulations that most, if not all, businesses fall under. One common misconception about compliance regulations is that they don’t equally apply to both private and public companies. To clarify, these regulations apply to all companies, of all sizes, whether they are privately-held or publicly-owned. 

For example, if you take credit cards for any reason, you fall under Payment Card Industry - Data Security Standards (PCI-DSS). Other common regulations are:

  • HIPAA Data Security & HITECH Act of 2009 which applies to Medical Providers and the healthcare industry.
  • GLBA/FFIEC apply to banks, credit unions, credit reporting agencies, and anyone in the financial industry.
  • FISMA is for Federal US Government Agencies.
  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) also gets involved with anyone who issues a privacy statement.

More than 45 states also have their own privacy rules, in addition to the ones listed above, that strongly recommend encryption of any personally identifiable information (PII).

So, beyond compliance with regulations, why should you care about encryption… and what is it anyways? First of all, your customers, clients, and suppliers all expect you to protect their sensitive data. Hackers and data thieves are targeting mid-sized companies because, as larger companies get better at securing sensitive information, the hackers see smaller companies as better targets. Financial fraud and data breaches become more common in those businesses that might not be as prepared without the resources to have an internal security team. Data loss can have a big impact on a company's reputation as well as their financial health.

AES encryption is a mathematical formula for protecting data.  It is based on a proven, well-known algorithm and standards published by NIST. Since that formula is a open and vetted standard use, it is not the mathematical algorithm that is the big secret. It is what happens with the “Key” that locks and unlocks the data that all the fuss is about.

Key management is so important because the encryption keys are THE secret that must be protected. Without access to the key, a hacker that accesses encrypted data has no way to read it. Industry standards and best practices for encryption key management, as well as compliance regulations that require proper encryption key management, all state that storing encryption keys on the server with the protected data is a poor security practice. Encryption keys are unique and cryptographically secure, and once created, protecting the key is the core practice that will protect the sensitive data. It will not be defensible in the event of a data breach if the keys were stored in the same server as the data. This would be like leaving the key to your house in the door lock and being surprised that someone entered uninvited!

Our solutions help Microsoft SQL Server customers really protect their data. Alliance Key Manager, our encryption key management solution, is NIST FIPS 140-2 compliant. This means it meets Federal standards that private enterprises expect around key management. We provide encryption key management solutions for every version and edition of SQL Server starting with SQL Server 2005. In addition, you can choose between a hardware security module (HSM), Cloud HSM, VMware virtual appliance, or a cloud instance in AWS or Azure. Easy. Efficient. Cost-Effective.

Please join our founder and data security expert, Patrick Townsend, in this 30-minute webinar that will cover encryption and key management best practices with Microsoft SQL Server!

Encryption Key Management for Microsoft SQL Server

As always, your comments and feedback are appreciated! 

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Get to Know Microsoft SQL Server Data Security Options

  
  
  
  

From the PASS Summit to the Worldwide User Group (SSWUG)

From Developers to Database Administrators, we have met another amazing group of people at the PASS Summit 2014. Over 5,000 members of the Professional Association for SQL Server converged on Seattle, WA and we got to talk about security with people from all over North America and from as far away as Norway, Spain, Australia, Colombia, Germany, and even Iceland.

Shayna at the PASS Summit 2014 booth

We spent most of our time talking about the importance of encrypting sensitive data, and about using an encryption key management solution to protect encryption keys away from the database. There is a huge need to meet compliance regulations, and with all the options now available (Hardware appliance, Cloud HSM, VMware virtual environment, and cloud instances in AWS or Azure) there is a solution for each scenario we encountered.

Encryption & Key Management in Microsoft Azure If you are working with SQL Server, we hope you are familiar with the SQL Server Worldwide User Group (SSWUG).  If you don’t know about them, please allow me a moment to introduce you to Stephen Wynkoop who is the founder and editor for SSWUG.org. This website is a wealth of information about everything you would want to know about SQL Server (and they are even branching out to other database systems like Oracle and IBM DB2). The emphasis at SSWUG has been on SQL Server and you will find a large number of articles, blogs, videos and other content on wide variety of topics related to it. Stephen features weekly video programs about the database and IT world, webcasts, articles, online virtual community events and virtual conferences several times a year. He is a Microsoft SQL Server MVP and the author of more than 10 books, translated into at least 7 languages. Stephen has been working with SQL Server since the very first version, with a prior experience in database platforms that included dBase and Btrieve.

SSWUG has dedicated a section of their web site to the SSWUGtv Security Edition Townsend Security Series where they present videos of Stephen and our own industry expert, Patrick Townsend, discussing security topics ranging from securing data with encryption and key management on SQL Server (not just with EKM) to protecting data in the cloud. Additionally, they post a new security segment just about every week on their homepage, so there is always something fresh. A few of the sessions include topics such as What top industries do Hackers focus on and why? and Cross-platform security: How do you have a hybrid environment and keep it secure?  

Check out this one on: PCI Compliance and Security in the Cloud - (11 minutes) 

Stephen and Patrick have a great time recording these videos, and if you haven’t seen any yet, I urge you to check them out. In addition to all the great content on the SSWUG website, SSWUG also holds virtual conferences and Summer Camps that are great online resources for developers.

You are also invited to download this latest white paper, authored by Stephen Wynkoop, on understanding options and responsibilities for managing encryption in the Microsoft Azure Cloud.

Encryption & Key Management in Microsoft Azure


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Making a Case for Two Factor Authentication

  
  
  
  

Taking Security Beyond Usernames and Passwords

Security professionals understand that passwords alone are just not good enough protection, and the on-going flood of data breach reports just confirms this on a daily basis. Enterprise IBM i users aren’t going to stop using passwords to login to their IBM i platforms, and hackers aren’t going to slow the flood of attacks any time soon. But now, we can take a giant security step forward by implementing two-factor authentication (2FA) to dramatically reduce the risk of a security breach. Two Factor Authentication IBM i White Paper

Compromised email, social media, online gaming, ecommerce, financial services and other types of cracked accounts continue to threaten both personal and corporate interests. Out of all the threats that face individuals and companies, account compromise stands out as one of the most easily addressed with available and mature security technologies.

Historically, companies used physical tokens to provide authentication on the IBM i beyond username and password. Even if someone hacked a user’s password, they still could not login without the physical token. Tokens represent another layer of protection, which is a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, tokens increasingly do not make fiscal sense for Enterprise IT departments who have to deploy, manage, and troubleshoot large numbers of tokens. There is a better way for organizations to quickly and cost-effectively roll out two-factor authentication to a large and sometimes global user base. Solutions that leverage the mobile phone as a reliable means of authentication have become readily available for the IBM i platform. For example, instead of tokens, businesses can simply send an SMS or voice message that contains a one-time authentication code to the individual user’s phone. This means cyber criminals cannot log into the IBM i without physical control of the actual phone.

Mobile phones and landlines present key advantages for verification and authentication regimes:

    • They possess unique identifiers – phone numbers, electronic identifiers and account numbers
    • They remain in the possession of users or near at hand most of the time
    • They are difficult to spoof
    • If stolen or otherwise misappropriated, they are easy to disable
    • Their association with actual individuals is verifiable through the operators that provide phone service

While none of these attributes alone are sufficient, together they provide a compelling basis for verification and authentication. The goal is to reduce fraud and actual theft of sensitive information by implementing something much harder to defeat than a login password. Combining something the person knows with something they have, or something they are, which can then be used for two factor authentication.

1. Something you know - a password. Even “strong” passwords can still be fairly weak from an attacker's point of view. With malware that easily detects them, passwords alone are a weak defense in relation to log-in security if that's all you have.

2.  Something you have - a mobile phone. It is now becoming quite common for companies to leverage what everyone already has in the way of the mobile phone or standard phone, and use that device as a mechanism for two factor authentication.

3. Something you are biometric authentication options.  Physically scanning for an iris pattern or fingerprint.

By using 2 of those 3 things you can authenticate more securely to the system.

Here are a couple examples of things that are not two factor authentication:

    • Requiring two passwords: using one factor twice is not 2FA!
    • Using shield questions of which are actually fairly easy in our social world to determine.

The IBM i platform has a well-earned reputation for security, but security is only as strong as the weakest point in the enterprise network. User PCs, internal and external web servers, and network applications represent points of attack. These systems are not safe from:

    • Memory scraping
    • Keyboard logging
    • Stolen vendor credentials
    • Stolen user passwords from external web services

Due to the nature and the extent of these security threats on the IBM i, two factor authentication has become a viable solution for meeting compliance regulations and safeguarding the vast amount of data and numbers of users with access to sensitive information on the IBM i. We're seeing Google, Facebook, Yahoo, and almost all large commercial banking websites implementing a two factor authentication system based on SMS text and or voice verification to give additional security to their users accounts and IBM i users now have an affordable solution for their platform. Find out more by downloading this white paper:

White Paper Two Factor Authentication on the IBM i

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The Most Frightening Data Breaches of 2014… So Far!

  
  
  
  

It’s not just “Target”… everyone has a bullseye painted on their information!

Unprotected Data is Way Scarier than this guy! Forget about vampires, werewolves, and other things that go bump in the night.  If you want to be truly frightened this Halloween, just take a look at some of the 395 data breaches reported in the first half of 2014 alone.

According to the Identity Theft Resource Center there has been a 21% increase in breaches (and that is just the ones that have already been reported to regulators) in the same period as last year.  Some of these you may be familiar with, others might surprise you:

  • eBay - online retailer
    The breach is thought to have affected the majority of the 145 million members when a database containing customer names, encrypted passwords, email addresses, physical address, phone numbers, and dates of birth was compromised.
  • Home Depot
    In a large nationwide malware attack, 56 million card records were stolen through point-of-sale systems. In a second attack in Atlanta, 20,000 employees personal information was stolen and used to open fraudulent credit cards by 3 human resource employees.
  • Michaels Stores - craft stores nationwide
    The point-of-sale (POS) systems at 54 stores were attacked using malware and up to 3 million payment card numbers and expiration dates were obtained.
  • Snapchat (online photo app and delivery service)
    4.6 million accounts were hacked and millions of images stolen. The information (phone numbers and user names) database posted online at Reddit and another site that has now been taken down.
  • Neiman Marcus (retailer)
    1.1 million payment cards were compromised over a period of 8 months as hackers repeatedly breached the point-of-sale systems through a central processing server.
  • AIG (American International Group)
    774,723 customers - The insurance provider confirmed the theft of a file server and two laptops that held personal information was by a former financial adviser.

Those are some pretty significant numbers, and most likely everyone that reads this blog has been affected in some way by at least one of these events. What we all need to remember is that cyber crime isn’t limited to “Black Hat” hackers that only go after the big piles of data.  Sometimes it is a disgruntled employee that destroys or releases sensitive data. Sometimes it is an unintentional employee error, or loss of an employee’s laptop/thumbdrive that thieves go after.  Often it is the smaller company or mid-sized Enterprise that hasn’t yet implemented security steps, like encryption and authentication, to protect their sensitive information.  

If the first list didn’t give you a fright, here is another that might make you tremble with fear. However, we would prefer if it resulted in the topic of data security brought up at your next security and risk management meeting!

Data Breaches are even more terrifying than this

University of Maryland
307,079 individuals - personal records
*Hackers broke in twice and stole data

North Dakota University
291,465 student and staff records

Sutherland Healthcare Solutions
168,000 patients
*Stolen computer equipment containing personal health & billing information

Sally Beauty Holdings (retailer)
25,000 customers lost credit card data to a hacker

Catholic Church - Archdiocese of Seattle
90,000 employees and volunteers - database records

Goodwill Industries (charitable resale)
868,000 customers from approximately 330 stores

Jimmy John’s (national sandwich shop)
*undisclosed number of customers from 216 corporate and franchised locations

Internal Revenue Service (IRS)
20,000 individuals affected
*Employee incident - loaded an unsecure drive into insecure home network

Assisted Living Concepts
43,600 current and former employees in 20 states, had their payroll files breached when the vendor’s system was hacked.

Coco-Cola
74,000 people lost unencrypted personal information to a former employee from Atlanta who stole 55 laptops. Company policy requires laptops to be encrypted, but they weren’t.

The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services
A server holding names, addresses, dates of birth, and Social Security numbers of approximately 1.3 million people was hacked.

Spec’s - wine retailer in Texas
Affecting as many as 550,000 customers across 34 stores, hackers got away with customer names, debit/credit card details (including expiration dates and security codes), account information from paper checks, and even driver’s license numbers.

St. Joseph Health System
Also in Texas, a server was attacked that held approximately 405,000 former and current patients, employees, and beneficiaries information.  This data included names, Social Security numbers, dates of birth, medical information, addresses, and some bank account information.

The US Department of Health and Human Services has a breach database of incidents related to exposure of personal health information.  Due to late entries, dates weren’t listed, but the following were reported:

  • 25,513 records at Dept. of Medical Assistance Services in Virginia
  • 22,511 records at Cook County Health & Hospital System
  • 18,000 records at Terrell County Health Dept. in Georgia
  • 10,000 records at Health Advantage in Arkansas
  • 84,000 records at St. Francis Patient Care Services in Tulsa, OK
  • 10,024 records at Missouri Consolidated Health care

A new study from researchers at Gartner indicates that it is markedly less expensive for companies to invest in new security and encryption technologies than it is for them to respond to a data breach. According to the analyst firm, businesses pay roughly $6 per year per user for encryption tools, or $16 per user per year for intrusion prevention software licenses, versus paying out an average of $90 per user to address problems after a breach has occurred.

Five steps you can take to make sure this doesn’t happen to you:

  1. Have a defense-in-depth strategy that meets your level of risk tolerance
  2. Make sure you know where all of your sensitive data is stored, and who has access to it
  3. Use standardized encryption algorithms to make that data unreadable
  4. Use an encryption key management solution to protect keys away from the data
  5. Use two-factor authentication whenever possible, because passwords are no longer enough

To help open up the conversation around your conference table, download this eBook “Turning a Blind Eye to Data Security” and find out more about the tools & resources to begin discussions about data security in your company!

Turning a Blind Eye to Data Security eBook

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Kudos to Tim Cook and Apple Computer

  
  
  
  

"We pave the sunlit path toward justice together, brick by brick. This is my brick."

Tim Cook, Apple CEO

Today was one of the most inspiring days of my life.

Tim Cook’s beautiful and courageous and inspiring coming out as a gay person will be noted as one of the significant events of our lifetimes. In one simple act Tim Cook took Apple Computer from a company that makes wonderful things, to a wonderful company; from a company known for its ability to make stuff, to a company known for its ability to inspire and lead humanity. He blazed a path for all of us, and changed how we will relate to the LGBT community forever. It was a beautiful and courageous act in itself, and it advanced us all towards a more humane, towards a more morally sane, future.

We are all deeply in Tim Cook’s debt.

We should not forget that behind every CEO is a board of directors, and a management team, and a large group of employees. Let’s recognize that every part of Apple Computer stands behind Tim Cook today. No one works alone, or leads alone, or can succeed alone. This was truly a day for everyone at Apple Computer to be proud of.

We honor you all.

Apple didn’t invent cool, but under Steve Jobs they came to make the most cool stuff. And they appropriated coolness as a part of their brand. Now, for the first time, with Tim Cook’s leadership, they really ARE cool.

It’s not what you make, it’s who you are.

Good Lord, for the first time in a long time I just want to buy something that Apple makes.

Well done Tim Cook, and well done everyone at Apple! This day belongs to you.

Patrick

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Protecting Sensitive Data in Amazon Web Services

  
  
  
  

Best Practices for Deploying a Key Manager in AWS

Cloud Security With Encryption Key Management in AWSThe cloud has transformed the way most industries manage their data. With services that offer cost-effective, scalable, “pay-as-you-go” options, it is increasingly rare to find a company that doesn’t want to migrate business-critical applications from an in-house data center to the cloud. Companies will make different decisions based on industry risk assessment, their own tolerance for risk, and compliance regulations, however, some Enterprises have been holding back on their migration to the cloud until comfortable that they can properly protect their most vital information. Data security was a concern when we had a fully controlled hardware environment, and now that we are moving to shared, multi-tenant virtual environments it has become even more critical.

Data encryption has had a reputation of being the hardest security measure to achieve and yet it is the best way to secure digital information that needs protection. One of the most important elements of encryption is using encryption key management best practices to keep the encryption keys safely stored away from the data they protect. An Enterprise key management solution will also provide dual control, separation of duties, and proper rotation of encryption keys to ensure that you (and only you) control, manage, and have access to your encryption keys and the data they protect.

Encrypting Data in AWS

Any cloud platform brings with it an additional set of security concerns, including the ability to implement and demonstrate regulatory compliance, as applications and services move into the cloud. Whether Enterprises bring their own applications and operating systems into the AWS cloud, or use the variety of options and rich set of services supplied by Amazon, lets take a look at ways data can be encrypted and the use of appropriate technologies to protect those vital encryption keys.

Virtual machine migration:  Probably the most typical cloud deployment involves IaaS (infrastructure as a service) where the operating system, database, and everything is contained with an application. By using industry standard encryption and key management,  vulnerabilities are significantly reduced and organizations are able to enforce compliance requirements.

Data storage options: Whether you are encrypting an entire database, or using column-level encryption for a more granular approach, you have options for database (data-at-rest) encryption.

Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) While RDS does not support encryption key retrieval and on device encryption services internally, it does to make it easy for applications to encrypt data going into and out of the RDS. You can retrieve encryption keys for application-level encryption or use on-device encryption before writing to, or reading data from, the RDS.

Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) is very popular for video, audio, and large files now with server-side customer supplied encryption and key management support. Each file can have it’s own encryption key, or you can use the same key to encrypt multiple files. With recent enhancements by Amazon, you can easily “bring your own key” and integrate a key manager to encrypt data being stored in S3 and decrypt data that is retrieved from S3 storage.

Amazon Elastic Block Storage (EBS) is available for any virtual machine running in an Amazon context to retrieve encryption keys and encrypt data in very straightforward application environment.

Choosing an Encryption Key Management Solution

Make sure your key management solution provides a rich set of SDKs and client-side libraries all of which run in cloud platforms and can be used through all of the storage services that Amazon provides. You should be able to choose to host the key manager in the AWS cloud as an Amazon Machine Instance (AMI), or in a hosted cloud HSM (which is gives you a dedicated HSM in a SOC 3 audited data center with a PCI DSS letter of attestation for compliance) or within a physical HSM under your full control within your own data center. Look for a key manager solution that runs exactly the same way in all of these environments, and ensures that you maintain ownership of your encryption keys at all times. So if you deploy in one location and then need to migrate, you can easily store your data in the appropriate locations. Also, using industry standard encryption and certified solutions for key management are critically important for meeting compliance regulations and following security best practices. Using a third party Cloud HSM gives you the assurance that your encryption keys are kept safely apart from your sensitive data. It is very important to make sure no one else has administrative access, because above all, encryption keys are the secret that must be protected within your encryption strategy.

With options for fee-based encryption key management services, as well as bring-your-own-license solutions, Townsend Security's Alliance Key Manager (AKM) for AWS allows Enterprises to properly manage their encryption keys while meeting security requirements in less time and at a lower cost. While it is not possible to perform FIPS 140-2 validation in a cloud service provider context, Alliance Key Manager uses the same FIPS 140-2 compliant key management technology available in Townsend Security's HSM and in use by over 3,000 customers worldwide. Alliance Key Manager for AWS provides full life-cycle management of encryption keys for a wide variety of applications to help organizations meet PCI DSS, HIPAA, and PII compliance at an affordable price.

To learn more about protecting your data in AWS, download this recent podcast by industry expert Patrick Townsend:

Encrypting Data in AWS

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